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Northern Minnesota. Image courtesy of Lee Vue.

Where We Stand: The University of Minnesota and Dakhóta Treaty Lands

Despite the centuries-long and ongoing erasure of Indigenous peoples from American history textbooks and classrooms, and the chronic consignment of Indigenous peoples to the past in mainstream American consciousness, it remains a fact that every inch of what is now the United States is land to which one or more Indigenous nations has a deep and abiding connection, and of which, at some point, the U.S. government at least tacitly acknowledged Indigenous ownership.

Pinhook Day Embrace, 2015. Image courtesy of David Todd Lawrence.

Storying Pinhook: Representing the Community, the Floods, and the Struggle

When They Blew the Levee is a fierce love letter to the power of community, one encoded to Black sociality, the broader American social imaginary, and the mythical power of the Mississippi River. In praxis, it is a political tool—a lyrical baseball bat—for the residents of Pinhook, Missouri to wield in a rally against the sustained structural violence of a biased justice system and racialized world.

A man walks his dog in front of an abandoned storefront.

Can L.A. build new parks and public spaces without gentrifying away low-income residents?

As plans move forward for revitalization of the Los Angeles River, questions arise about the potential for “green gentrification.” Waterfront redevelopments often do not serve everyone in the community; many eyes will be on LA to see if this problem can be solved.