Tag: feminist art

Although Ukeles is known for her public and environmental “maintenance art” from the 1970s and 1980s, her focus on religion during this same period is not well known. By focusing on Mikva Dreams and her other mikvah projects, this article contextualizes and makes better visible Ukeles’s contribution to contemporary American art and its feminist discourses.

Judithe Hernández and Patssi Valdez: One Path Two Journeys
Curated by: Thomas Canavan
Millard Sheets Art Center at Fairplex, Pomona, California, September 1, 2017–January 28, 2018

Laura Aguilar: Show and Tell
Curated by: Sybil Venegas
Vincent Price Art Museum, East Los Angeles College, September 16, 2017–February 10, 2018

Reviewed by: Charlene Villaseñor Black, Professor, Department of Art History and César E. Chávez Department of Chicana/o Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

Curated by: Cecilia Fajardo-Hill and Andrea Guinta

Hammer Museum, University of California, Los Angeles, September 16, 2017-February 10, 2018

Reviewed by: Alison Fraunhar, Associate Professor, Department of Art and Design, Saint Xavier University, Chicago

Tracing the movement of Stettheimer’s works brings into view a variety of previously unexamined venues in which art and commerce converged. . . . This essay reveals the previously overlooked diversity of Stettheimer’s exhibition practices and argues that the period’s lack of rigid boundaries between art and commercial culture resulted in nuanced class and gender-based mingling and sorting, not democratic equivalence, within the spaces of early twentieth-century American modernism.

During the last half century, the history of American sculpture has been transformed dramatically. Very roughly, during the first twenty-five years (i.e., from the late 1960s to mid-1990s), scholars used object- or artist-based documentary scholarship, connoisseurship, and formalist analyses to create the foundation publications.