Call For Proposals: “Towards a More Inclusive Digital Art History”

Posted February 10, 2020

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Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art invites submission of 500-word proposals for feature articles focused on Digital Art History to be published as part of the new initiative, “Towards a More Inclusive Digital Art History,” which is supported by a major grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Panorama (journalpanorama.org) is the first peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication dedicated to American art and visual culture (broadly defined). The Journal encourages a broad range of perspectives and approaches within an interdisciplinary framework encompassing both local and global contexts and is published by the University of Minnesota Libraries.

The goal of “Toward a More Inclusive Digital Art History” is twofold—to increase both inclusivity and access. First, in order to encourage a more comprehensive approach to the history of American art, we seek to publish digital art history scholarship that focuses on the contributions of constituencies that have historically been marginalized and/or under-researched, and to make this available worldwide, for free and with open access. Second, our priorities will be accessibility, manageability, and sustainability. To that end, we seek proposals, both collaborative and individual, from scholars with all levels of knowledge about the digital humanities and will prioritize supporting scholars who may have little or no institutional support for digital scholarship. We aim to provide a model for sustainable digital art history research that can be accessible to a wide range of scholars, including those who will need to learn digital humanities methods without institutionally provided technical assistance. We also encourage computational approaches to art-historical analysis that employ low-cost, open-source applications. In this way, the project will provide models for other scholars to emulate regardless of financial or institutional support. Finally, we plan to encourage the accessibility and sustainability of digital art history by doing something that is all-but unprecedented in the field: We will publish and preserve the datasets underlying scholars’ peer-reviewed research along with their articles and project narratives. This will enable other scholars to view and test the data on which the research is based and employ the data for their own teaching and research, thereby expanding the project’s reach.

Panorama invites submission of proposals for feature articles to be published as part of this new initiative, “Towards a More Inclusive Digital Art History.” Selected authors will be invited to participate in a Digital Humanities workshop in Washington, DC, in October 2020. This workshop will give participants the opportunity to develop their research projects with Panorama’s editorial team and experts in the field of digital publishing. The first article in this series will be published in 2021.

To submit a proposal, send your c.v. and an abstract of approximately 500 words that summarizes the topic of the proposed essay, how it represents scholarship on understudied areas of American art, and why it could benefit from a digital art historical approach. Authors do not need to identify precisely which digital methods they would like to use—this will be addressed at the workshop and determined in collaboration with Panorama editors. Instead, use the abstract to explain why the research questions addressed in the essay could benefit from—or even demand—a digital approach. The Terra Foundation has also provided some funding to support attendance at the Workshop, so please also let us know if you require assistance with accommodation and travel expenses. Proposals should be sent to journalpanorama@gmail.com with the subject heading “Digital Art History CFP response” and are due April 15.