Spring 2020 (6.1)

Articles

Historical Memory, Reconciliation, and the Shaping of the Postbellum Landscape: The Civil War Monuments of Forest Park, St. Louis

Historical Memory, Reconciliation, and the Shaping of the Postbellum Landscape: The Civil War Monuments of Forest Park, St. Louis

When viewed collectively, these monuments—and the ceremonies surrounding them—offer significant insight into the changing views and attitudes of the St. Louis citizenry with regard to sectional reconciliation, illuminating the shifting memories and evolving history of the Civil War in Missouri and the political, social, and cultural implications of the bloody and divisive conflict.

In the Round

Bully Pulpit

What is the Place of Empire in the History of American Art?

Overseas empire building remains a blind spot in our field due to both a specific historiographic bias—with origins dating back to an era of Cold War exceptionalism, when scholars focused on defining the “Americanness” of US art both past and present—and the longtime privileging of continental over territorial concerns in American culture more broadly.

Responses

Anna Arabindan-Kesson

Shana Klein

Taína Caragol and Kate Clarke Lemay

Florina H. Capistrano-Baker

J. M. Mancini

Stacy L. Kamehiro

Research Notes

A Portrait on the Move: Photography, Literature, and Transatlantic Exchanges in the Nineteenth Century

A Portrait on the Move: Photography, Literature, and Transatlantic Exchanges in the Nineteenth Century

The pair of Portraitstudie images . . . suggest that international exchanges and collaborations were central to the development of photography well beyond the initial flurry of activity around 1839.
“The Bulk of the Best Visible Things”: Judd’s Review of <em>Twentieth Century Engineering</em> at the Museum of Modern Art

“The Bulk of the Best Visible Things”: Judd’s Review of Twentieth Century Engineering at the Museum of Modern Art

“Dams, roads, bridges, tunnels, storage buildings and various other useful structures comprise the bulk of the best visible things made in this century,” wrote Donald Judd in October 1964.
A “Studio-House” for Georgia O’Keeffe

A “Studio-House” for Georgia O’Keeffe

The existence of these drawings among O’Keeffe’s papers raises a number of questions: first, why did [architect Peter van der Meulen] Smith create them in the first place? Second, how did they come to be in O’Keeffe’s possession? And third, did the drawings influence [Maria] Chabot’s design for the separate studio building at Abiquiu?

Book Reviews

Exhibition Reviews