Fall 2020 (6.2)

Special Anniversary Issue

Five Years of <em>Panorama</em>—Forty Years of AHAA

Five Years of Panorama—Forty Years of AHAA

With contributions by Austen Barron Bailly, M. Elizabeth Boone, Peter John Brownlee, Sarah Burns, Teresa A. Carbone, Wanda M. Corn, Ellery Foutch, Alicia Harris Jacqueline Francis, Lauren Lessing, Jennifer Jane Marshall, Jeffrey Richmond-Moll, Jessica Skwire Routhier, Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, Louise Siddons, Naomi Slipp, and David Sokol

In the Round

Colloquium

Self-Criticality

We have been called, individually and collectively, to recognize and redress deficits that limit our ability to see ourselves and each other fully—deficits that likewise condition and constrain our work in the academy and the museum.

Responses

Nizan Shaked

Eddie Chambers

Rafael Cardoso

Susette Min

Annie Ronan

Ann Reynolds

Research Notes

The Story of Edward Hill and the African Groom at Shirley Plantation

The Story of Edward Hill and the African Groom at Shirley Plantation

I have looked at hundreds of colonial portraits, and the most intriguing figure that I have seen is unnamed, barely visible, only about five inches tall, and whose face is largely obscured. This figure is an African groom—who I can now argue is the first known representation of a person of African descent in a British North American painting.
Traversing Two Cultures: A Portrait of William McIntosh, Southern Slave Owner and Lower Creek Chief

Traversing Two Cultures: A Portrait of William McIntosh, Southern Slave Owner and Lower Creek Chief

This research note reflects on the ways in which portraits function as complex indicators of racial, cultural, and regional identities and histories. It argues that the flexibility of meaning for such paintings lies not only with the artist and the sitter, but is equally shaped by audiences and historians.
“The Time Has Now Gone by When Things of This Nature Are to Be Hidden from the Public”: Mediating Bodily and Archival Violence

“The Time Has Now Gone by When Things of This Nature Are to Be Hidden from the Public”: Mediating Bodily and Archival Violence

In finding out more information about Banks’s life, might I somehow redress the bodily and archival violence that rendered her an unnamed figure in a museum display? Moreover, how could I tell Banks’s story—or, a story of racialized violence—without committing further violence in my own act of narration?
Wyeth in Taiwan

Wyeth in Taiwan

The choice of Wyeth—not Pollock, not Warhol—to represent the kind of American art that the publishers wished to highlight in the magazines to their burgeoning [Taiwanese] readership, almost three decades after the end of WWII, was indeed curious. Why Wyeth, in the early 1970s?

Book Reviews

Exhibition Reviews