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Spring 2021 (7.1)

Special Section

In the Round

Colloquium

American Art History in the Time of Crises

Taken together, the responses to this Colloquium present the individual experiences of nine contributors who personally reflect upon the events of the past year. We hope that their narratives create a rich stage for understanding how such critical issues and questions—many of them long lying in wait, but raised acutely by 2020—intersect.

Responses

Crystal L. Keels

Anuradha Vikram

Courtney A. McNeil

William L. Coleman

Adam M. Thomas

Mark A. Castro

Taylor Bythewood-Porter

Andrea Barnwell Brownlee

Kelli Morgan

Research Notes

A Research Portal for American Watercolors, Prints, and Drawings 1850–1925: A Source for Obscure Catalogues, Artists’ Societies, and Women Artists

A Research Portal for American Watercolors, Prints, and Drawings 1850–1925: A Source for Obscure Catalogues, Artists’ Societies, and Women Artists

This resource also offers a model for sharing the background research that is often too detailed, wide-ranging, and extraneous to be published in a conventional format, as well as too inaccessible in museum archives or scholars’ homes for general use.
<em>Nature:</em> A Nineteenth-Century Engraving Linking Charles Willson Peale, James Akin, and Peale’s Mastodon

Nature: A Nineteenth-Century Engraving Linking Charles Willson Peale, James Akin, and Peale’s Mastodon

“Did you know Peale’s mastodon is in Germany?!,” I asked in emails and in a post on social media. No one seemed to have known, with responses generally disbelieving.
New Discovery: Robert S. Duncanson’s <em>Ruins of Carthage</em> (1845)

New Discovery: Robert S. Duncanson’s Ruins of Carthage (1845)

By depicting a celebrated African site singled out by African Americans at an 1843 state convention in Michigan as proof that “we are worthy of the name of American citizens,” as asserted by Committee Chairman William Lambert, Duncanson was expressing race pride and alliance with African Americans seeking enfranchisement.
“The Most Perfect Manner”: Paul Weber and the Transnationalism of US Landscapes

“The Most Perfect Manner”: Paul Weber and the Transnationalism of US Landscapes

I was struck that contemporary viewers of Weber’s painting apparently did not mind the vagueness of the image’s relation to the American land it was thought to depict. . . . Weber was thought to ably capture a quintessential national identity through nature, even if he appeared unwilling to brand his work as a glorification of a strictly American spirit.
“Anglo-Saxon”: Nationalism and Race in the Promotion of Edward Hopper

“Anglo-Saxon”: Nationalism and Race in the Promotion of Edward Hopper

Taking cues from the critique of institutional racism sharpened by the Black Lives Matter movement and from more recent scholarship, I consider here how Hopper’s work was promoted in a time of cultural nationalism, as well as how his art should be reassessed in the light of today’s attention to cultural diversity.

Book Reviews

Exhibition Reviews