Tag: 3.2

This essay touches on continuities between Thiebaud’s food paintings and his landscape paintings, and on the ways his landscapes broach the seemingly irreconcilable differences between abstraction and representation. Centrally, it engages the ways in which his landscape paintings, focusing on the ecologies of California, engage major human concerns about place, space, and habitation.

Discourses of health, hygiene, and progress—visual and textual—provide the primary metric with which to recalibrate thinking about the Panama Canal enterprise and zone as an ecology located at the nexus of intersecting discourses.

Tracing the movement of Stettheimer’s works brings into view a variety of previously unexamined venues in which art and commerce converged. . . . This essay reveals the previously overlooked diversity of Stettheimer’s exhibition practices and argues that the period’s lack of rigid boundaries between art and commercial culture resulted in nuanced class and gender-based mingling and sorting, not democratic equivalence, within the spaces of early twentieth-century American modernism.

Two of the most prominent Native-made objects in Jefferson’s original hall were a pair of male and female figures that Jefferson had received several years prior to Lewis and Clark’s shipments. Curiously, the figures had disappeared from the historical record with Jefferson’s death in 1826. It came as quite a surprise, then, that during my internship I reidentified two stone heads that today sit in the hall display cases and are what remain of Jefferson’s original statues.

Curated by: Romi Crawford, Abdul Alkalimat, and Rebecca Zorach / Curated by: Daniel Schulman, with Jeffrey Huebner and Michelle Rene Perkins

Chicago Cultural Center, February 25–July 30, 2017 / January 21–June 25, 2017

Reviewed by: Marissa H. Baker, PhD candidate, University of Illinois at Chicago

Susan Rather

New Haven: Yale University Press in association with the Paul Mellon Center for Studies in British Art, 2016; 316 pp.; 100 color illus.; 80 b/w illus.; ISBN: 978-0-300-21461; Hardcover: $75.00

Reviewed by: Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire, Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library, Winterthur, Del.

Daniel Maudlin and Bernard L. Herman, editors, with contributions by Emily Mann, Carl Lounsbury, Anna O. Marley, Peter Guillery, Peter Benes, Alison Stanley, Christopher DeCorse, Louis P. Nelson, Kenneth Morgan, Stephen Hague, Bernard L. Herman, Lee Morrissey, and Daniel Maudlin

Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2016; 352 pp.; 6 illus.; 74 b/w illus.; ISBN: 9781469626826; Paperback: $39.95

Reviewed by: Whitney Martinko, Assistant Professor of History, Villanova University