Summer 2016 (2.1)

Articles

The Progress of the Century

Art and Invention in the United States

The original CAA session examined the intersection of art and invention, and innovation and experimentation in American art from the early nineteenth-century to the 1980s. In this special issue, we present three of those innovative papers from the session, by Elizabeth Bacon Eager, Laura Turner Igoe, and Cary Levine and Philip Glahn.
Kara Walker’s <em>About the title</em>: The Ghostly Presence of Transgenerational Trauma as a “Connective Tissue” Between the Past and Present

Kara Walker’s About the title: The Ghostly Presence of Transgenerational Trauma as a “Connective Tissue” Between the Past and Present

Kara Walker, the renowned and controversial African American artist, was the subject of a major survey exhibition, Kara Walker: My Complement, My Enemy, My Oppressor, My Love, which was organized by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and was presented there from February 17, 2007 through May 11, 2008

In the Round

Roundtable on Pedagogy: Jules Prown

Roundtable on Pedagogy: Jules Prown

Jules Prown’s approach to making and teaching art history is among the most well documented methodologies in the discipline. Look no further than his canonical “Style as Evidence” (1980) or “Mind in Matter” (1982). What he offers here will enter the historical record as a complement to these earlier pieces.

Bully Pulpit

Is American Art History Conservative?

In a way, the question we have asked of our five respondents: “Is American art history conservative?” is an odd one. Despite the troublingly combative obduracy that the psychic and physical boundaries of American-ness have assumed in the larger political discourse this election season, the field of American art history has never been more catholic in its interests or inclusive in its approaches.

Responses

Jennifer Doyle, Professor of English, University of California, Riverside

Bruce Robertson, Professor, History of Art and Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara

Emily Casey, Doctoral Candidate, Art History, University of Delaware

Michael Gaudio, Professor of Art History, University of Minnesota

Catherine Holochwost, Assistant Professor, La Salle University

Research Notes

From the Research Notes Editors

From the Research Notes Editors

The tone and format for Research Notes are different from a learned essay or a review. Instead the focus is on your work and an aspect of your scholarly research that you want to share.
Fata Morgana: Jean-André Castaigne, the American Indian, and American Artistic Aspirations in France

Fata Morgana: Jean-André Castaigne, the American Indian, and American Artistic Aspirations in France

When I was working on my dissertation on constructions of American cultural identities in fin-de-siècle Paris at Washington University in St. Louis in about 2009, I stumbled upon a five hundred page English-language novel published in 1904 by a French artist.
Exanimate Subjects: Taxidermy in the Artist’s Studio

Exanimate Subjects: Taxidermy in the Artist’s Studio

In the course of researching my dissertation “Animal Pursuits: Hunting and the Visual Arts in Nineteenth-Century America,” I have often had occasion to consider (and sometimes lament) the unequal relationships between humans and animals that are frequently pictured in art.

Book Reviews

Exhibition Reviews